Tuesday, September 1, 2015

Unwind

Unwind
Author: Neal Shusterman
Rating: 4/5 Stars
Reviewer: Julie H.

http://ccsp.ent.sirsi.net/client/en_US/rlapl/search/results?qu=unwind+neal+shusterman&te=&lm=ROUND_LAKE

Summary: In Shusterman’s frightening dystopia, a law allows parents to have misbehaving children “unwound” between the ages of 13 and 18. The child is taken to a camp before finally being dismantled and used for donor organs. When Connor finds out his parents have decided to have him unwound, he runs away to try to survive on his own until he turns 18 and is safe from unwinding. Along his journey he meets Risa and Lev, two other unwinds with their own sad pasts. Together, they may be able to survive, and maybe even change the world.

Review: While the basis for this story seems unbelievable (who would agree to creating a law that allows children to be used for donor organs?) it isn’t actually too far away from things that have happened throughout history. If you can suspend your disbelief enough to give this book a chance, you will find that it is well-written, fast-paced, and scary without being graphic. The characters feel real, and the premise of the book is thought-provoking. If you enjoy dystopian fiction, and you’re looking for an exciting read, give this book a shot! I would recommend this book for mature teens and adults. Some content may be disturbing for younger readers.

Tuesday, August 25, 2015

The Honest Truth

The Honest Truth
Author: Dan Gemeinhart
Rating: 4/5 Stars
Reviewer: Sue

http://ccsp.ent.sirsi.net/client/en_US/rlapl/search/results?qu=the+honest+truth+dan+gemeinhart&te=&lm=ROUND_LAKE&dt=list

Summary: When twelve-year-old Mark learns that his cancer has returned and he will need to go in for another round of chemotherapy, he decides to set out to achieve one last big goal.  He promised his deceased grandfather that he would climb Mount Rainier.  Without telling his parents, he leaves home with his camera, his notebook, his dog and a plan to reach the top of Mount Rainier – even if it’s the last thing he ever does.  This compelling book is about incredible determination, friendships, heartaches, and ultimately dealing with whatever life throws at you. 

Review: The book is definitely worth reading.  It deals with a difficult subject (cancer), but the short chapters, and straight forward way that Mark makes his decisions is realistic.  The ending is very appropriate with everything that has happened to Mark.  A well written, good book.  

Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Dear Zoo

Dear Zoo
Author: Rod Campbell
Rating: 5/5 Stars
Reviewer: Sue


Summary: A child writes to the zoo asking for a pet.  The zoo sends various animals, but they are all not quite right.  The giraffe is too tall, the camel to grumpy, the elephant too big, etc.  Finally they send the perfect pet – a puppy!

Review: This lift-the-flap book is one of my favorites.  The language and illustrations are simple.  It is perfect for one of baby’s first books, and sure to be become a favorite for your baby too.  The flaps are easy to open, and the animal sounds can be made for each animal that is sent. 

Tuesday, August 11, 2015

The Yes

The Yes
Author: Sarah Bee
Rating: 3/5 Stars
Reviewer: Julie

http://ccsp.ent.sirsi.net/client/en_US/rlapl/search/detailnonmodal/ent:$002f$002fSD_ILS$002f0$002fSD_ILS:2412237/one?qu=the+yes+sarah+bee&lm=ROUND_LAKE&dt=list

Summary: This colorful and beautifully illustrated picture book chronicles the challenges the Yes, a “great big orange thing” faces as it travels through forests, rivers, and hills to get to its goal. All along the way, the Nos tell him he can’t do it, but the Yes pushes on. The book features made-up words and has an almost Seuss-like quality about it. 

Review: I thought this book was lovely to look at and conveys a strong message: there will always be people around you telling you that you can’t do something, but it only takes your own faith in yourself for you to succeed. However, this book may not be suitable for very young children, as it is important for them to learn to listen when they are told no. In the book, the Yes climbs a tall tree, goes over a rickety bridge, and swims across a deep river, and all of these are things that could be potentially dangerous to a child who disregards someone else’s warnings.

I would recommend this book for older children and even adults who need could use a little positivity and encouragement in their day!

Tuesday, August 4, 2015

Room for Bear

Room for Bear
Author: Ciara Gavin
Rating: 4/5 Stars

http://ccsp.ent.sirsi.net/client/en_US/rlapl/search/results?qu=room+for+bear&te=&lm=ROUND_LAKE&dt=list

Summary: Bear and a family of ducks try to find the perfect home to share, but what suits the bear does not suit the ducks, and what suits the ducks does not suit Bear.

Review: This was a really cute book that depicts love and family and that sometimes who you consider family is not always biological. The ducks and bear couldn’t live without one another so they found a way to make it work.  I would recommend it.

Tuesday, July 28, 2015

Hank Has a Dream

Hank Has a Dream
Author: Rebecca Dudley
Rating: 3.5/5 Stars
Reviewer: Denise Z.

http://ccsp.ent.sirsi.net/client/en_US/rlapl/search/detailnonmodal/ent:$002f$002fSD_ILS$002f0$002fSD_ILS:2383071/one?qu=hank+has+a+dream&lm=ROUND_LAKE
 

Summary: Hank relates to a friend a dream in which he flies to the sea, past the trees, and over the clouds.
Review: I enjoyed the unique illustrations in this book more so than the story. Author and Illustrator Rebecca Dudley impressively designs everything that is depicted in each picture for the story, including Hank the bear and the scenery that surrounds him. This is a picture book with few words and unique illustrations that makes it worthwhile to pick up and read at least once.

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Hidden

Hidden
Author: Loic Dauvillier
Rating: 4.5/5 Stars
Reviewer: Julie H.

http://ccsp.ent.sirsi.net/client/en_US/rlapl/search/detailnonmodal/ent:$002f$002fSD_ILS$002f0$002fSD_ILS:2337239/one?qu=hidden+loic+dauvillier&lm=ROUND_LAKE

 
Summary: This serious graphic novel begins with a young girl listening as her grandmother shares, for the first time, of how she was hidden away from the Nazis after being separated from her parents as a young Jewish girl in Paris. The story is sad, but ends on a positive note. The book also includes an afterword that provides more historical details to accompany the story.
Review: While this graphic novel is about a grim subject, it also highlights the kindness of people in a time of need and the power of hope. The illustrations really convey the characters’ emotions, and the dialogue will teach young readers about a terrible time in history while still offering them a happy ending. I would recommend this for children 3rd grade and up, and I encourage parents to read this book with their child and discuss this difficult subject together.